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TRUST: The Foundation for Reputation and High Performance

December 9, 2013 - In Featured, Strategic Change and Organisational Effectiveness - No comments yet

‘An organisation that trusts itself is more likely to show trust to others’ 

In October 2013 a conference was held in London to consider how business can restore its reputation in an atmosphere of public concern about ethical behaviour.  The context, heavily influenced by the aftermath of the 2007/2008 financial crisis is sharpened by more recent events such as the mis-selling of retail financial products PPI etc, the rigging of the Libor interest rate and the concern over energy prices.

The conference included executives from major companies, fund managers and representatives from the Church and its purpose was to debate the Blueprint for Better Business initiative.  Practical principles are being drawn up to be applied to business situations and training programmes.  The draft principles include, among others, that a person is a ‘someone, not a something’ and that managers should ‘show respect for the dignity of each person and for the whole person…’ Continue reading TRUST: The Foundation for Reputation and High Performance.


Book Recommendation: Exposure by Michael Woodford

October 9, 2013 - In Other Articles - No comments yet

Exposure

This book has been quite an eye opener to how some businesses in Japan operate.  The importance of reputation, self interest and status at the top of some Japanese companies is the main driving factor for those in power, not the success of the business they run and the people working for them.  Self preservation is number one priority.  Michael Woodford comes across as a fair-minded person, with strong leadership values and with the good of the company at heart.  However, he appears to have walked into foreign territory when he became CEO.  He may have been familiar with the Japanese way of doing things but at this level, things were different – corruption is rife, the truth is not acknowledged, authority rules and management practices are quite shocking.

As Michael Woodford points out, this attitude is reflected in the opening message of the The Fukushima Nuclear Accident Independent Investigation Commission http://www.nirs.org/fukushima/naiic_report.pdf

‘What must be admitted – very painfully – is that this was a disaster “Made in Japan.”  Its fundamental causes are to be found in the ingrained conventions of Japanese culture: our reflexive obedience; our reluctance to question authority; our devotion to ‘sticking with the program’; our groupism; and our insularity.’ 

The implications of this are worrying – a few powerful, self interested people are in control of this potentially highly dangerous industry – among others!

It is an exciting, well written book and Michael Woodford has an easy, sincere style.  His struggle to be CEO and enable the company to be successful in the face of strong resistance and corruption is a sad tale.

Recommended by Sue Nelson

 


Organisational Effectiveness by Richard Nelson

October 1, 2013 - In Strategic Change and Organisational Effectiveness - No comments yet

An organisation’s ability to serve its customers successfully and compete with its competitors is critical if it is to prosper over time.’

No matter how obvious this statement may seem, many organisations fall short in taking the necessary actions to build the probability of success in their favour.  We have witnessed the credit crunch, stimulated by overly ambitious financial innovation, and the subsequent financial crisis. Continue reading Organisational Effectiveness by Richard Nelson.


Coaching Development For Managers by Richard Nelson

November 28, 2012 - In Leadership in Management - No comments yet

The increase in the use of external coaches in organisations, especially for executives, may obscure the value of developing managers to be effective coaches.  Coaching is a critical element of the managerial role.  More precisely, it is a practical demonstration of leadership.  Leadership involves engaging the commitment of people, inspiring the emotions as well as providing clear performance expectations. Continue reading Coaching Development For Managers by Richard Nelson.


Executive Workshops, by Richard Nelson.

November 28, 2012 - In Strategic Change and Organisational Effectiveness - No comments yet

“One of the major benefits that the workshop can provide is the chance for the participants to ‘stand backand reflect on the practical implications of their strategic decisions.”

The term ‘Workshop’ is now common currency among managers, consultants in management and management educators.  It tends to cover a range of events, from seminars and training courses to events of an essentially practical nature.  It is these practical experiences that we are concerned about here.  The main difference between a seminar and a workshop is that a seminar is a teacher-led event developed from subject matter researched and selected by the seminar leader, usually with a teaching purpose.  A workshop is more typically designed by a consultant/facilitator from research undertaken with the prospective participants of the planned workshop. Continue reading Executive Workshops, by Richard Nelson..


STRATEGIC PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT: Aligning Performance Management To The Business

November 10, 2012 - In Managing Performance - No comments yet

For a business to perform most effectively, the link between its strategic direction and the management of individual performance should be a direct and transparent one. This delivers results to both the organisation and its employees: people are more motivated to perform when they are usefully communicated with and feel part of the overall plan and organisational team; and businesses perform better when their people are motivated to make a full contribution. Continue reading STRATEGIC PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT: Aligning Performance Management To The Business.


The CEO Proposition – Some leadership ideas for senior executives by Richard Nelson

November 9, 2012 - In Featured, Strategic Change and Organisational Effectiveness - No comments yet

Getting the best out of your executives individually and collectively and, ultimately, your organisation can be a challenge for which there are few ready-made answers.  This is because your situation is unique and defined by the special characteristics of your organisation’s purpose and direction, culture, structure, processes and systems and people.  Leading changes to improve the effectiveness of the organisation often needs a multifaceted approach. Continue reading The CEO Proposition – Some leadership ideas for senior executives by Richard Nelson.


HR in the 21st Century – A High Level Summary By Richard Nelson

May 4, 2011 - In Strategic Change and Organisational Effectiveness - No comments yet

The Development Context

The future of HR is closely related to the current/future needs of organisations. HR will need to contribute more directly to improving the performance of organisations if it is to play a core role in the businesses of the future. HR will need to focus on delivering outcomes. It will be important for HR to be defined by what it delivers rather than what it does. Continue reading HR in the 21st Century – A High Level Summary By Richard Nelson.


Culture and Leadership by Kate Harrad

May 4, 2011 - In Leadership in Management - No comments yet

It is probably true to say that there are very few companies in which the leader has total control and influence over the company’s culture, and also very few where they have no influence at all. Within this range of possibilities, however, it is difficult to generalise about the degree of impact that leadership has on organisational culture.

There are, however, patterns that can be identified, and phases through which companies tend to develop in terms of the way that their culture grows, and the effect that the leader has on it. Continue reading Culture and Leadership by Kate Harrad.


Talent Management: How Organisations Can Help or Hinder by Richard Nelson

February 17, 2011 - In Managing Performance - No comments yet

Talent management has become a familiar phrase among managers and HR professionals, stimulated by McKinsey’s ‘war for talent’. The idea has often courted controversy, especially when it has meant concentrating development resources on an elite. But what is talent management? It seems that some businesses are not entirely sure: the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD)’s 2006 survey of learning and development found that 80% of organisations reported no definition of ‘talent’. Also, perhaps not surprisingly, 60% of organisations had no talent management strategy. A recent survey has shown that this is improving. Continue reading Talent Management: How Organisations Can Help or Hinder by Richard Nelson.


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